Accreditation
 
European Film Academy - Young Audience Award 2016 v Bratislave
Tuesday 19.04.2016

European Film Academy - Young Audience Award 2016 v Bratislave

Martin Žiaran, ASK
Tuesday 29.03.2016

Martin Žiaran, ASK

Fridrik Thor Fridriksson
Sunday 20.03.2016

Fridrik Thor Fridriksson

Bartosz Konopka
Wednesday 16.03.2016

Bartosz Konopka

EFA master class with Paco Delgado
Tuesday 08.03.2016

EFA master class with Paco Delgado

 

Fever

Between political and cinematic contexts

Agnieszka Holland´s second feature film - an adaptation of the 1910 novel The Story of a Bullet by a socialist writer Andrzej Strug. The winner of a Silver Bear for Best Actress during 31st Berlinale.

„The stuffy, 'feverish' atmosphere of the dying revolution was amazingly created through cinematic form. The grim world shown in the adaptation of Strug's novel is dark and shown through the dynamic camera of Jacek Petrycki, which expressed the protagonists' emotional turmoil. Agnieszka Holland's brutally honest and ironic perspective finds a great equivalent in Fever's audiovisual style.“
culture.pl


The film is set in 1905, in a time of feverish revolutionary underground activity in Poland. The story follows the passing of a bomb from anarchist to anarchist as several attempts are made on the life of Tsarist governor general, until, in the end, it is effectively and harmlessly defused by a bomb expert. The presence of the bomb has a destroying effect on all the Polish revolutionaries, they either die or break down.

„Holland doesn't idealize the revolutionists' actions: violence is shown in a drastic, revolting way. It's enough to mention the naturalistic scene wherein the kind-hearted villager Wojtek kills a supposed spy. The executioner is not able to kill his victim quickly, so the execution becomes a slow torture. The utopian project of the revolution contrasts with the awful method of realizing political goals.“
culture.pl


Fever is an explicitly political film that was released at an important moment in Polish political history. It shows details of the failures of group and individual political commitment. By the time the film was featured at the Berlin International Film Festival in February 1981, the strikes in Lublin, Gdansk and other cities had led to the rise of the Solidarity Movement. The film was immediately banned by the Polish Communist government upon its release, because of its brutally realistic portrayal of the occupying Soviet forces.


"You see characters here who are so naive as to think you have only to be against something to get what you want, a play or a revolution. It’s not enough. I think if you look closely at most of my films you’ll see people like them. They’re dreamers, but they don’t have life experiences or the tools to back them up. They can only simplify things, and that’s dangerous."

Agnieszka Holland


Cast Olgierd Łukaszewicz, Barbara Grabowska, Adam Ferency, Bogusław Linda, Krzysztof Zaleski | Directed by Agnieszka Holland | Written by Krzysztof Teodor Toeplitz | Produced by  Zespół Filmowy X |  Cinematography Jacek Petrycki | Editing Fernando Franco | 122´ | Poland | 1981